OT: mic'ing the pit

What are good mic's to use for  the mallet instruments.  I tried sm57's but I didnt get a good sound. Any suggestions? Thanks

-darryl jones
You know guys, I have learned more from reading the last two posts that I have from the last combined two or three months of trying to figure out this stuff myself.  Thanks so much for offering this OUTSTANDING reference/resource.

[quote author=drumcat link=topic=1307.msg6258#msg6258 date=1160808492]
Amen - that's approaching definitive...

One thing that I don't believe was correlated -- wind noise tends to be in the very low frequencies, but more importantly, pit instruments are some very defined boogers.�� If you take a look at a pit recording, particularly just a couple of keyboards, examine a waveform in a spectral view and you'll find what looks like a piano roll.�� Keyboard notes are VERY frequency isolated.�� In fact, during the 2000 BD show, I used to use the ";Frank is an american badass"; part to use Audition to simply highlight the guys voice, and drop it 24db.�� He became passing noise.�� The reason you can do it is because the keyboard notes stick out like stars at night.

The point is that if you are running into wind, make sure you're eq'ing the notes themselves.�� EQ isn't simply a v shaped thingy on your boombox.�� It's a sort of ";volume control"; for a frequency space.�� Thus, when you look at that vibe that's A440, you're literally at 440Hz.�� If you do nothing but raise that area of the eq, the mic'd vibe gets louder.�� There are so few overtones, and such a fundamental sound, especially on a metallic, that raising the ";lows"; to add bass is just pointless.�� So if you reduce those bass frequencies that are prevalent in wind, you can cut out quite a bit without losing the fundamental tones.

Know thy octave when EQ'ing.�� Rock on Tyler.
[/quote]

Exactly.�� I might have removed that section about wind noise when I re-organized my post.�� Thanks for bringing that back up.

Wind noise tends to stick around 60-80hz, and in those areas there is very little ";musical"; content.�� For a record in the studio, it is an extreamly important area since it is your sonic foundation.�� However, on the field it isn't a big deal.�� The amp sound isn't replacing what the pit can do naturally.

I also think it is extreamly important to reiterate that small changes equal big sound differences in regard to EQ.�� Adding 2dB at 2 kHz isn't just adding 2 kHz.�� EQ's work on a slope basis (what is called a ";Q"; control on EQ's), like this-

[img]http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j114/drumjustinp/EQCurve.jpg[/img]

As you can see, the frequencies around 2K are effected as well.�� Remember this when working with simpler EQ's, like on most small boards.�� Most do not have Q control, so remember that the bandwidth might be fairly wide.


In the long run, use your ears.  Make it musical, treat your amp settings the same as the dynamic settings you would apply while writing and teaching a show.  You're lucky that you think mostly about the music and not about the tech crap.  Audio dorks like me start to think more about tech stuff over the musical choices.
[quote author=RGreen link=topic=1307.msg5762#msg5762 date=1155788837]
I wonder if we could lobby shure or another pro-audio company to design a line of mics specifically for outdoor and indoor percussion instruments? Where to position the mic with attachements for ALL lines of keyboards.

Need a vibe mic....the blah blah mic is specifically designed for making your vibes sound great with the lush...blah blah blah.

you know the routine.

I would just feel better purchasing something that I know has been researched for me and I would gladly pay for it.
[/quote]

I agree completely with this.  I wonder if we will ever see anything like this...
[quote author=Dave Ratliff link=topic=1307.msg6817#msg6817 date=1167173272]
[quote author=RGreen link=topic=1307.msg5762#msg5762 date=1155788837]
I wonder if we could lobby shure or another pro-audio company to design a line of mics specifically for outdoor and indoor percussion instruments? Where to position the mic with attachements for ALL lines of keyboards.

Need a vibe mic....the blah blah mic is specifically designed for making your vibes sound great with the lush...blah blah blah.

you know the routine.

I would just feel better purchasing something that I know has been researched for me and I would gladly pay for it.
[/quote]

I agree completely with this.�� I wonder if we will ever see anything like this...
[/quote]

Generally most mics are fine for keyboards, a good dynamic instrument mic or condenser will work great.  Placement is a huge factor in sound, and if you are not experienced in it it can be a major pain to try and get a good sound.  I'm still working on that live sound setup manual I mentioned a few weeks ago.  It covers placement pretty in depth.

I have thought about designing and selling some shockmounts specifically designed for keyboards, and for different placement areas.
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