What do you listen to?

Simply put, what groups have you been digging lately and what sort of stuff would you recommend for our humble community of people to check out?  Here are a few from me...

[b]The Renegades[/b]
Based out of Chicago, the frontman for this group is none other than Paul Mutzabaugh who played quads for Cavaliers 97-00. All three CDs they've cut are awesome.  They can best be described as a very ecclectic fusion group. Check out ";On The Make";
http://cdbaby.com/cd/renegades

[b]Kick the Cat[/b]
Another Chicago-based fusion group. Check out ";Camel Toe vs. Snaggle Tooth"; :-)
http://www.kickthecatmusic.com/

[b]The Everyday People[/b]
An Austin-based group that, to me, is almost a mix of Maroon 5 and John Mayer, in terms of the musical content.  Just saw these guys at Galveston and they were pretty darn good.  The guy who is now their drummer is an old high school/drum corps friend of Robbie Green, a member of the forum here. Anyhow check em out...
http://www.theeverydaypeople.com

Those are just what I'm listening to as of late.  Bring on the goodness!
If you want a great mind-expanding drumset workout, try playing along to any [b]Nickelcreek[/b] CD. These guys are just amazing. My wife saw them in concert, shared a CD with me and Now i'm hooked. They have an interesting philosophy on shifting time signatures, simply that if it sounds like you're trying to, then it probably won't sound natural. (BTW: there is no percussion parts to 99% of the songs, so you get total creative reign!!!!)

Maybe it's my irish roots, but I can't get enough of [b]Enter the Haggis[/b]. It's a celtic rock band from Toronto including a violin, bagpipes, electric guitar, set, and bass. The band has gone through a lot of changes, but their cd ";Casualties of Retail"; wins on my itunes list for most played.


None of my students know this, but I'm actually a pretty big [b]Notorious BIG[/b] fan. Not so much for the ";occasional"; bad language, but his laid back and creative approach to rhythm is mind boggling. (at least on the Life after death album)

And saving the best for last, I will never fully understand the genius of [b]Samuel Barber[/b]. The unique voice that man had was staggering. I  can't get enough.
[quote author=perpetualpoet link=topic=2380.msg12764#msg12764 date=1207659191]
If you want a great mind-expanding drumset workout, try playing along to any [b]Nickelcreek[/b] CD. These guys are just amazing. My wife saw them in concert, shared a CD with me and Now i'm hooked. They have an interesting philosophy on shifting time signatures, simply that if it sounds like you're trying to, then it probably won't sound natural. (BTW: there is no percussion parts to 99% of the songs, so you get total creative reign!!!!)[/quote]

I'm actually working on a percussion ensemble (with violin) of a Nicklecreek tune.  I think it is going to be a pretty cool sounding chart once all is said and done...
I'm sure this is old news, but if you don't have Manu's album ";Playground"; you should look into it.
Perca Du - Awesome percussion duo from Isreal.
http://www.percadu.com/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=garu-eGN14I

My favorite piece of thiers is Udakrup Agrabad....If you haven't heard it....It's a must.

Marc Broussard - Check it out.

http://www.marcbroussard.com/

Every musician in the group has got soul....and a deep pocket.
I am actually listening to a classic rock stuff.  I have been pulling out the old tunes from some great bands such as: Rush (can't get enough of Neal Peart), Boston, Journey, REO, Aerosmith, ACDC, Van Halen, and several others.  Also, listening to the new Eagles album.  I guess I'm showing my age.
Nik Bartsch = incredible jazz overtones minimally approached.

So clean.

me likey.

mm
I recently checked out Mingo Fishtrap, Safri Duo, Marc Broussard, and others that you guys have all suggested. All I can say is good call on everything. I have yet to check out Nik Bartsch and his stuff, but I cant wait to actually get my ears on it.

Of course, one can never have too much Dave Matthews Band. Its always good, and always can bring out a smile, no matter what the mood is.


To touch on what someone said about the So Percussion group, they are going to be coming through my area, and I think they might stop in and do a clinic here at SHSU. For any Texas cats, as soon as I find out anymore info, I will be sure to post it on here and get details as well.

One more thing.... some of you know Shawn Glyde, the little brother of David Glyde (BD drum staff). Anyway, he's a very talented drumset player and if you have not checked him out, I highly suggest it.

Some reviews:

http://www.jazzmonthly.com/artist_ag/glyde_shawn/reviews/gylde_review.html

http://www.moderndrummer.com/updatefull/200001591

http://www.organissimo.org/forum/index.php?showtopic=29147

http://www.shawnglyde.com/    (If you want to check out his website)


MH
Andres Segovia
Mingo Fishtrap
So Percussion
anything DCI related lol

and of course Dave Matthews Band.

One other group I like to listen to just for its lyircal sense is Fort Minor. While a bit on the urban/hip-hop side, the lyrics are very edgy and to the point with many issues of today.
Nine Inch Nails' [b][i]Ghosts I-IV[/i][/b] has been getting a lot of play lately, along with a load of Porcupine Tree.

I've been very into Yes as of late... Heart of the Sunrise and Close to the Edge have been dominating my playlist. As one of my friends put it... ";What makes Yes so great is that they always sound like they could fall apart at any minute";.

I'm always listening to either Rush or DMB at work.  Also very into Porcupine Tree, Spock's Beard, Phish, Dream Theater... jam bands and hard rock.

I also recently discovered Isao Tomita (sp?) and I'm in love with everything this guy does.  It gives a new perspective on some classical literature and has given me some great ideas.
Happy ";First of May"; to all you Jonathan Coulton fans in the house! ;)
Not sure what genre they'd fit under, but lately I've been getting into a lot of guys like Jack Johnson, Colin Hay, David Gray, Ben Harper, and Donavon Frankenreiter.

If you have listened to it, the soundtrack from Atonement is great, it has some fun rhythmic themes, and some really powerful moments.
[quote author=Jim Casella link=topic=2380.msg13023#msg13023 date=1209662496]
Happy ";First of May"; to all you Jonathan Coulton fans in the house! ;)
[/quote]

YES!!
Ditto on Yes, Rush, and Tomita. 

I am also a big fan of the Berlin Philharmonic; especially anything conducted by the late Herbert von Karajan, who was the conductor for the Berlin Philharmonic for 35 years.
Login or Signup to post a comment